LifeZone Nutrition Handout

Download LifeZone Nutrition Handout

Words Commonly Found on Food Labels:

Calorie Free: less than 5 calories per serving

Low Calorie: 40 calories or less per serving

“Light”or “Lite”: 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat per serving; if more than half the calories are from fat, fat content must be reduced by 50% or more.

Light in Sodium: 50% less sodium per serving; food must have more than 40 calories or 3 grams of fat per serving.

Fat Free: less than ½ gram of fat per serving

Low Fat: 3 grams or less fat per serving

Cholesterol Free: less than 2 milligrams cholesterol per serving and 2 grams or less saturated fat per serving.

Sodium Free: less than 5 milligrams sodium per serving

Very low Sodium: 35 milligrams or less sodium per serving

Low sodium: 140 milligrams or less sodium per serving

My Daily Needs!

*** Make ½ your plate fruit and vegetables***

Vegetables:

Women:

  • 19 – 30 years old – 2 ½ cups
  • 31 – 50 years old – 2 ½ cups
  • 51+ years old – 2 cups

In general, 1 cup of vegetables is equal to 1 large vegetable (1 large pepper, tomato, sweet potato, etc.), 1 cup of cut up vegetables (about the size of your fist) or 1 cup of 100% juice.

Fruits:

Women:

  • 19 – 30 years old – 2 cups
  • 31 – 50 years old – 1 ½ cups
  • 51+ years old – 1 ½ cups

In general, 1 cup of fruit is equal to 1 medium to large piece of fruit (orange, apple, banana, etc. about the size of a tennis ball) or 1 cup of 100% juice.

Grains:

Women:

  • 19 – 30 years old – 6 ounce equivalents total, 3 ounce equivalents whole grains
  • 31 – 50 years old – 6 ounce equivalents total, 3 ounce equivalents whole grains
  • 51+ years old – 5 ounce equivalents total, 3 ounce equivalents whole grains

In general, 1 slice of bread, 1 cup of ready made cereal, or ½ cup of cooked rice, cooked pasta, or cooked cereal can be considered as 1 oz. equivalent of the grains group.

Proteins:

Women:

  • 19 – 30 years old – 5 ½ ounce equivalents
  • 31 – 50 years old – 5 ounce equivalents
  • 51+ years old – 5 ounce equivalents

In general, 1 oz. of meat, poultry, or fish (3 oz. is about the size and thickness of a deck of cards), ¼ cup cooked beans, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon of peanut butter or seeds can be considered as 1 oz. equivalent in the protein group.

Dairy:

Women:

  • 19 – 30 years old – 3 cups
  • 31 – 50 years old – 3 cups
  • 51+ years old – 3 cups

In general, 1 cup is equal to 1 cup of milk, cottage cheese, etc. 1 ½ oz. of hard cheese (1 oz. is about the size of 4 stacked dice.)

Calorie Needs:

  • 19 – 30 years old – 2000 – 2400
  • 31 – 50 years old – 1800 – 2200
  • 51+ years old – 1600 – 2200

General Rules of Thumb:

  1. Get to know your body, get personal!
  2. Don’t skip meals, eat small portions and eat more frequently.
  3. Avoid processed foods.
  4. Drink water ½ of body weight in ounces. Water contributes to fat burn.
  5. This should be an all the time lifestyle.

FAT FACTS

Many people think that fat is bad, but did you know that your body actually needs fat; just not as much as more people eat. Fats are important to give your body energy for cells to grow, protecting your organs and help keeping your body warm.

The major types of fats in foods are saturated fats, trans fats (the “bad” fats), monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (the better fats). Each fat has different characteristics and different effects on your health.

BAD FATS

BETTER FATS

Saturated Fats

Trans Fats

Monounsaturated Fats

Polyunsaturated Fats

Commonly Found in These Foods *  (Mainly from animals) beef, lamb, pork, poultry with the skin, beef fat, lard, cream, butter, cheese, other whole-or reduced- fat dairy products*  (Some from plants) palm, palm kernel, and coconut oils

*  Some baked goods, snack foods, and fried foods

*  Baked goods – pastries, muffins, cakes, pie crusts, doughnuts and cookies.*  Fried foods – French fries, fried chicken, breaded chicken nuggets and breaded fish.

*  Snack foods – popcorn, crackers.

*  Traditional stick margarine and vegetable shortening.

*  Vegetable oils – olive, canola, and peanut.*  Avocados

*  Many nuts and seeds – almonds, and peanuts/ peanut butter.

*  High in Omega-6 Vegetable Oils –  coconut, safflower, and sunflower oils.Many nuts and seeds – walnut and sunflower seeds.

*  High in Omega-3 (EPA and DHA) Fatty fish – salmon, tuna, mackerel, herring and trout.

Effect on Heart Health *  Raise LDL “bad” cholesterol level*  Foods high in saturated fats may also be high in cholesterol

*  Increase risk of heart disease

*  Raise LDL “bad” cholesterol*  May lower HDL “good” cholesterol

*  Increase risk of heart disease

*  Reduce LDL “bad” cholesterol*  May lower risk of heart disease *  Reduce LDL “bad” cholesterol*  May lower risk of heart disease

 

Characteristics *  Carbon atoms saturated with hydrogen atoms*  Solid at room temperature *  Created in an industrial process by adding hydrogen to liquid vegetable oils*  Solid at room temperature

*  Contained in “partially hydrogenated oils”

*  Have one double-bonded (unsaturated) carbon*  Liquid at room temperature, but turn solid when chilled *  More than one double-bonded (unsaturated) carbon*  Liquid at room temperature and when chilled
Daily Limit *  Less than 7% of total daily calories*  If you eat 2,000 calories a day, less than 140 calories (15 grams) can be from saturated fats *  Less than 1% of total daily calories*  If you eat 2,000 calories a day, less than 20 calories (2 grams) can be from trans fats *  Total fats should be about 25% to 35% of total daily calories*  Eat foods with monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats instead of saturated or trans fats *  Total fats should be about 25% to 35% of total daily calories* Eat foods with monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats instead of saturated or trans fats.
Download LifeZone Nutrition Handout